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Our Physio Services

At Physio4Me we provide various referral services including referral:

  • for an MRI scan
  • for a DXA scan
  • for an X-ray
  • to a Specialist or a Consultant

Why should you use Phsyio4Me’s referral service?

To arrange an appointment for certain medical services you need to be referred by HCPC registered medical practitioners, it is not possible to self-refer. In certain circumstances it may be possible to be referred by your NHS General Practitioner, however even in these circumstances this can often be a very slow process.

Please note that Physio4Me referrals are for private (insurance or self-paid) appointments, not NHS appointments.

Physio4Me provides efficient and accurate referrals for those who do not want to, or cannot, wait.

To help you to understand what you should expect from our different referral services please read on below…

What is an MRI?

An MRI (Magnetic resonance imaging) is a scan that uses magnetism and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body.

Why would I need an MRI?

An MRI can be used to aid diagnosis of disease or injury and/or to monitor response to treatment. MRI’s are conducted of different segments of the body, not of the body as a whole. A computer uses signals from the MRI machine to create a series of pictures of the relevant section of the body. Each picture shows a thin slice of the body.

A diagnostic report will be prepared by the radiographer who will be able to interpret the images accurately. This report is yours, as are the images. You can request copies of both the report and images to be sent to your practitioner. If you request the report and/or images to be sent to a specific practitioner on your referral form we will communicate this to the clinic before your appointment.

Do I need to do anything specific to prepare for an MRI?

In certain circumstances it may not be possible to conduct an MRI. For this reason it is important that you fully complete the Physio4Me referral form, including the contraindication section, before submitting your request.

What can I expect to happen on the day of the scan?

When you arrive at the clinic you will be asked to prepare for the scan by changing into a medical robe and removing any metal piercings and jewellery. You will then be taken into a room with the MRI machine.

 

Mri ScanMRI scanner machines can be either open or closed.

Closed machines look like large tubes with holes at both ends.

You will be asked to lie on a table that will slide into the tube.

Open scanners are open on all sides and you will be asked to lie on a table that slides between the upper and lower plates.

 

 

The technicians may place cushions or supports around the part of the body to be scanned to hold it comfortably in a certain position for the duration of the scan. You will be asked to lie still throughout the scan. The scan is totally painless.

During the scan you will hear thumping or tapping sounds, you will usually be provided with headphones and be able to choose music to listen to so as to not hear the machine during the scan.

You may feel a slight twitching sensation during the scan. This is normal and happens due to nerves being stimulated by the magnetic field and radio waves

It usually takes around 15 to 30 minutes to scan one segment of the body.

What can I expect from Physio4Me?

We will complete a referral letter or form and direct this to an MRI clinic in your area. The relevant clinic will then get in touch with you to organise a suitable time for your appointment.

Open mir scanner

What is a DXA?

A DXA or DEXA scan is a type of X-ray that measures bone density. It is often used to assess risk of osteoporosis.

Why would I need a DXA?

A DXA scan is often used to assess a patient’s risk of developing Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis has no symptoms other than frequent bone fracture. For that reason a DXA scan is commonly recommended for those over the age of 50 years old with a risk of developing osteoporosis or those under 50 years old with stronger risk factors (including a history of fracture).

If you are between 40 and 90 years old you can use the World Health Organization 10-year Fracture Risk Assessment Tool to assess whether a DXA scan might be appropriate for you.

DXA scans are also commonly used to track bone density of runners who may be at increased risk of stress fracture due to overload during heavy periods of training.

A report will be completed after your scan. This report is yours and you can request for a copy to be sent to your practitioner. If you request the report to be sent to a specific practitioner on your referral form we will communicate this to the clinic before your appointment.

The report compares your bone density with the “normal” expected bone density for a healthy adult of your age, gender and ethnicity. The difference between your score and that of a healthy adult of your age, gender and ethnicity is called a Z score. A Z score of below -2 would indicate that your bone density is lower than it should be for your age, gender and ethnicity.

The report will also compare your bone density with that of a healthy young adult. The difference between your score and that of a healthy young adult is known as a T score. A T score of -2.5 or below is defined as osteoporosis.

Do I need to do anything specific to prepare for a DXA?

You don’t need to make any special preparations before having a DXA scan. Some clinics ask you to change into a medical robe when you arrive but others conduct the scan whilst you are fully clothed – although you would be asked to remove any clothes with metal components.

In rare cases it may not be possible to complete a DXA scan, for that reason you are required to complete the contraindication section of our referral form before we can complete your referral.

What can I expect to happen on the day of the scan?

You may be asked to change into a medical robe when you arrive at the clinic for your scan. However if your clothes do not include any metal components certain clinics will conduct the scan whilst you are fully clothed.

You will be taken into the room with the DXA machine and the scan will be completed by a radiographer.

A DXA scan is relatively quick, lasting around 5 minutes only. During this time you will be asked to lie still on your back on a table and a scanning arm will pass over the top of you. The machine is not enclosed so you should not feel claustrophobic.

ScanThe machine does not make any loud noises and the scan is completely painless.

What can I expect from Physio4Me?

We will complete a referral letter or form and direct this to a DXA clinic in your area.

The relevant clinic will then get in touch with you to organise a suitable time for your appointment.

 

 

What is an X-ray?

An X-ray is a type of radiation that can pass through the body. It is absorbed by different tissues at different rates. Specifically, it is difficult for X-rays to pass through bone which results in bone showing up white in the pictures produced by an X-ray. X-rays can pass through softer tissue, such as internal organs, more easily resulting in these areas showing up darker.

Why would I need an X-ray?

An X-ray is a diagnostic tool and is commonly used to detect a range of conditions including: bone fracture; dental issues (including abscesses); heart problems (including heart failure); pneumonia; scoliosis and tumours (both non-cancerous and cancerous).

A diagnostic report will be prepared by the radiographer who will be able to interpret the images accurately. This report is yours, as are the images. You can request copies of both the report and images to be sent to your practitioner. If you request the report and/or images to be sent to a specific practitioner on your referral form we will communicate this to the clinic before your appointment.

Do I need to do anything specific to prepare for an X-ray?

You do not need to do anything specific to prepare for most X-rays. However some X-rays use a contrast die in which case it may be necessary to stop eating and drinking some time before. You will be advised well in advance of your appointment if this is the case.

You should let the clinic know if you are pregnant as there is an increased risk to an unborn child and the clinic may wish to conduct the X-ray at a later date, after the birth, unless it is an emergency.

What can I expect to happen on the day of the scan?

You will usually be ask to remain in a certain position whilst the X-ray is performed. The X-ray will take only a fraction of a second. The X-ray machine is a machine containing a large bulb and it will be positioned above the area to be scanned by the radiographer. It is likely that images will be taken from a few different angles. The whole process will take only a few minutes and is completely painless.

X-Rays

If you are having a contrast X-ray you will need to attend the clinic earlier in the day in order to be given the contrast agent. You will be fully informed well in advance of your appointment if this is required.

What can I expect from Physio4Me?

We will complete a referral letter or form and direct this to an X-ray clinic in your area. The relevant clinic will then get in touch with you to organise a suitable time for your appointment.

Why would I need to be referred to a specialist or Consultant?

Certain conditions should be treated by specialists. For example if you require a surgery. It can be difficult to locate a suitable specialist and often it is not possible to self-refer. Physio4Me can help, we have a list of tried and trusted specialists and Consultants suitable to assist you with various conditions.

Alternatively if you would like to be referred to a specific specialist or Consultant we will be happy to assist.

What can I expect from Physio4Me?

As a UK based provider of online exercise prescription software we will complete a referral letter or form and direct this to one of our specialists or Consultants in your area who will be suitable to assist with your condition, or to the specialist or Consultant that you have requested. The relevant clinic will then get in touch with you to organise a suitable time for your appointment.